Tag Archives: Lent

Mass – Palm Sunday 2020 – Cardinal John Dew

Cardinal John Dew, Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand celebrates Mass in his Chapel with Fr David Dowling (Cathedral Parish Priest) and Gerson Badayos (Pre-Seminarian)

Links to Music listed below. Order of Service for Sung Mass: https://issuu.com/wellingtonmetrocathedral/docs/palm_sunday_2020

Links contained in the above:
Psalm: https://soundcloud.com/shc-choir/palm-sunday-psalm

Gospel: https://soundcloud.com/shc-choir/palm-sunday-the-passion-of-our-lord-jesus-christ-according-to-matthew

Motet: https://soundcloud.com/shc-choir/solus-ad-victimam

Hymn: https://soundcloud.com/shc-choir/o-sacred-head-sore-wounded

The Cathedral Connection 8 March 2020

The full newsletter can be viewed here

Dear friends

Last Wednesday evening I enjoyed the first of our mission-focused Lenten Programme sessions jointly supported by our Cathedral Parish and the Anglican Cathedral Parish.

David Rowe, the Dean of the Anglican Cathedral challenged those present to wake up to God and to one another. He spoke of Lent being a time to build bridges and relationships. The question was asked: How do we relate to God and to one another?

In the fourth century men and women (known as the Desert Fathers and Mothers) went into the desert in search of a deeper relationship with God.  They had many wise sayings. One of them was: “The person who loves worldly things loves stumbling blocks. When we lose something, therefore, we should accept it with joy and thanks as we have been relieved from care.”

Living in the desert was not about living in isolation.  It was about living for God.  If we are not careful, our desire for wanting to acquire more and more worldly things can distract us from living for God. Lent is a good opportunity for us to ‘go into the desert’ to identify the stumbling blocks that hinder us from developing a deeper relationship with God and one another.

The second evening in our series of five joint Cathedral parish gatherings is this Wednesday 11 March, in Connolly Hall beginning with refreshments at 6.45pm for a 7pm start. Cardinal John will speak about what we can learn from Pope Francis about all being called to mission and having hearts that are open and expanded by love. Everyone is most welcome.

Wishing you many blessings this Lent.

Fr David

The full newsletter can be viewed here

The Cathedral Connection 1 March 2020

The full newsletter including Lenten Events can be viewed here

Imagine the cost of forty days and forty nights in a five star hotel. Pampered beyond belief and no doubt charged for the pleasure. Imagine too forty days and forty nights confined to a small room. A harsh reality for those who have been quarantined onboard cruise ships with the recent outbreak of COVID-19 (novel coronavirus). For Jesus too, he was quarantined, by the Spirit, in the wilderness, and as you may have worked out – quarantine means, literally, forty days.

Forty days of confrontation with the same temptations we have today and forty days with the sound of silence. Something that in our busy worlds we hardly get much of! The forty days of Lent are a wonderful opportunity to pause, listen, and in that time and space that silence holds, find a place where we can reflect.

Lent, much like life is not an exercise to be endured. It is a mystery to be unfolded, and it begins from the inside out. So rather than giving up chocolate or alcohol and then patting ourselves on the back and feeling good, perhaps we could dare to be more vulnerable and allow the Spirit to guide us to our own wilderness where we are challenged. In turn we are offered the opportunity to grow, beginning our own journey with Christ to his death and resurrection.

Michael Fletcher
Director of Music

The full newsletter including Lenten Events can be viewed here

Cardinal John’s Newsletter 27 February 2020

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Kia tau te rangimarie ki a koutou,

Last Saturday, 22nd February, was the Feast of the Chair of St Peter, a feast once described by Pope John Paul II as “shedding light on the special ministry of Peter strengthening and guiding the Church in the unity of faith which the Lord entrusted to the head of the Apostles.” he went on to say that this mystery of unity comes from “Fixing our gaze on Christ.”

The Lenten journey we have begun is all about “fixing our gaze on Christ.”

Lent is a time to hear again the call of Jesus to “repent and believe the good news.” The call to personal conversion is at the heart of the message of Jesus and is clearly at the heart of the ministry of Pope Francis. The Pope is very clear about the fact that ALL of us are constantly called to conversion of heart. In his first year as Pope, on the Feast of St Ignatius Loyola, he said in a homily: “The question ‘is Christ the centre of my life?’ is for us, for any of us, the ques-tion that cannot be taken for granted. It cannot be taken for granted because there is always the temptation to think that we are the centre; and when we put ourselves and not Christ at the centre, we err, we go astray”.

I think that sometimes the temptation for us is also to think that the call to personal conversion, to “fix our gaze on Christ” is for others and not for me. In this time of Lent when we are invited to pay closer attention to the Word of God, we know that is so we can personally focus on our relationship with Jesus, and not on all the other things that worry, distract or preoccupy us.

One of the strategies of Pope Francis in his work to reform the Church, and especially the Roman Curia (which was asked for in the Cardinals’ meetings leading up to his election) is to keep emphasising that this is always about per-sonal conversion. It is about a change of heart, putting Jesus at the centre of life and fixing our gaze on him. When Jesus is at the centre and the focus of our lives the relationships that we have with others improve, the things that worry us fall into place – even things like the question of Mass times, what will happen with “MY” parish, and how to cope with the many questions we are faced with today seems to fall into place.

The questions for Lent therefore are:

  • How do I keep my gaze fixed on Jesus?
  • How do I make Jesus the centre of my life?
  • How do I focus on Jesus in the days ahead?

Naku Noa,

+John

The full newsletter can be viewed here