Tag Archives: School

The Cathedral Connection 17 December 2017

The full Parish newsletter can be viewed here.
The Parish School end of year newsletter can be viewed here.

WHEN THE FAMILY GATHERS

The 10.30am Mass today is a “Family Mass”. On this occasion, the younger children among us take leading roles in the celebration and, with just a week before Christmas, offer an interpretation of the Bethlehem story. This may mean some disruption, as the youngsters may not get everything in the right order, or may not be clearly heard by everyone. Perhaps their excitement will disturb the silence many are used to; others may find this Mass more informal than usual.

Yes, things may be a little different, but this is one occasion we should all “rejoice and be glad” to be part of. The fact that our children want to be with us older folk, and want to participate by sharing their understanding of the coming of Jesus, speaks well of their families and their schooling, and tells us the story of God’s love revealed in Jesus is very much alive for the next generation.

The scene might accurately portray the “chaos” not only of the first Christmas, when there was overcrowding and general mayhem, but the situation when any family gets together. Noisy arrivals, constant chatter, kitchen mess, bedding everywhere, excitement and nonsense! There might be exhaustion at the end but no one really minds. It was so lovely just being together!

This is my prayer for our parish family as we near Christmas and on into 2018:

May we each know the strength of togetherness and be grateful for
our differences. May we pause in our busyness to look in wonder
at the beauty about us. May we honour the poverty of the
first Christmas and know the richness of the peace it brings.
May we welcome laughter, gift joy to every moment, give thanks for
everything and journey on with hope-filled hearts.

Fr James

 

The Cathedral Connection – 1 October 2017

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

As a mother, this Gospel story really resonates with me. So often I ask my children to do something and the reply is, “yes I’ll do it later.” What I hear is, “I’m not going to do it but by telling you I am going to do it later it will mean you will get off my back.” On a good day I will let it go. But on a day when I am feeling a bit stressed I’ll argue the fact that I want it done now. And we all know only too well how that scenario plays out!

In the story it says the son changed his mind. In reality both sons changed their minds. They both did the opposite of what they said they were going to do. But what if what they did was more than just changing their minds? What if what really happened was a change of heart? It was this same change of heart that was easy for the tax collectors and prostitutes to do but for some reason the ‘so called learned’ just didn’t get it.

What is it that stops us from having a change of heart? What is it that makes us say one thing but then we do something else?

So often we find ourselves doing this. We may say we will pop in and have a cuppa with someone but we never really find the time. Or we may say we will get onto that pile of paperwork but there is always something more interesting to spend our time on. What really matters is right practice and right words.

Not so long ago, after hearing someone saying wonderful words but seeing their actions were not reflecting what they were saying, it made me sit up and think, “Am I like that? Do I do that?” I sat down and wrote in big bold letters: May my actions always reflect my words. We know the saying actions speak louder than words but what if we made a real point of our words and actions singing from the same song sheet and really resonating rather than being a clanging bell?

There’s a song by Neil Diamond called “What a beautiful noise.” It speaks about a beautiful noise going on everywhere and that it’s the music of life. It’s well worth listening to. Perhaps we can be the start of a revolution that has our words and actions singing off the

 

same music sheet creating a beautiful noise.

Fiona Rammell, Lay Pastoral Leader

 

The full newsletter can be viewed here.