All posts by Cardinal John Dew

About Cardinal John Dew

Archbishop of Wellington: His Eminence Cardinal John Atcherley Dew DD

Cardinal John’s Newsletter – 12 October 2017

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

Dear Friends,
At the Closing Mass of our Synod on 17 September people were given a prayer card as they left the Cathedral. On the card was a photo of the stained glass window of the Josephite Convent in Mission Bay, Auckland. The window has the following words on it, words attributed to Nano Nagle, the Foundress of the Presentation Sisters.

“Go out, you may not rest secure for need calls loudly. You must seek God there. Loving shall be your flame.”

Need does call loudly. That need is in our homes, work-places, factories, offices, schools, on the streets; it is the needs of young children, teenagers, young marrieds and their families, the mid-dle aged ad the elderly. Various proposals out of the 96 I received spoke of all those age groups and the multi-faceted needs that are “out there.”

All of the proposals and the practical actions that came out of the Synod will be published in the next edition of WelCom on Sunday 5 November. The synod Outcomes booklet containing all the outcomes of the Synod will also be available at that time. That is also the day that I will formally promulgate the work of the Synod at the monthly Young Church Mass at the Cathedral at 7pm. I will ask every parish to read out my Promulgation Letter, and to draw attention to the Synod outcomes in WelCom.

Need does call loudly. Nano Nagle has reminded us that we find God in these needs. The Archdiocese, its parishes and schools, organizations and departments will all begin to plan as to how these needs identified at the synod can be met. To assist parishes there is a section in the Outcomes Booklet on developing a pastoral plan which provides guidance on how to move ahead with implementing the Synod directions and priorities. This section will be sent directly to Parish Leadership teams and Chairs of Pastoral Councils in the next week.

Since the Synod I have been thrilled at how many people have commented about how much they appreciated the discernment process we used. They have said they are applying it to their own personal lives, their families and in some cases their work.
Please continue to reflect on and use this process, it will help us all to discern

-where we are to go out to
-what the needs are that are calling loudly
-where will find God
-how loving will be our flame.

With all good wishes and blessings

+ John

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

Cardinal John’s Newsletter – 28 September 2017

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

Dear Friends,

Two weeks ago when I wrote this Newsletter it was the day before our Synod “Go, you are Sent” began. It was a wonderful weekend, thank you all for your prayers, which most certainly helped the Synod to run smoothly and which enabled people to participate fully in the listening and discernment process. If there was one message I heard from people over the weekend it was about how much they appreciated the prayerful discern-ment process and the wish that such processes could be used in parish life. There is absolutely no reason why that cannot happen, and indeed I hope that it will.

A huge amount of work went into the Synod:

  • the planning of the Synod Committee,
  • the training of facilitators and scribes,
  • the two pre-synod days in May,
  • the engagement in the consultation phase and the extensive feedback,
  • the actual participation over the weekend,
  • the liturgies and prayer over the weekend
  • the analysis of recommendations as they came in

THANK YOU ALL

In a way the work now begins. I have received a total of 96 recommendations. They are all important for the life of the Archdiocese and I will be planning, with others, as to how these recommendations can become reality. Some things are clear:

  • we all need to be involved and we all need to do some things differently,
  • theological, spiritual and liturgical formation has been identified as a major requirement,
  • it is essential that we search out, identify and go to the peripheries,
  • we are to embrace bicultural relationships as an integral part of all that we do

There are many more challenges before us. I will need the generosity and creativity of all of you to help give life and energy to the Archdiocese, its parishes, schools, colleges, organisations, families and to every individual.

Pope Francis sent us a wonderful message for the Syn-od. His challenge to us was to be “authentic missionary disciples.”

That is a challenge to us all, we can do it but we are never disciples alone.
We are always disciples together and we are always gifted with the Spirit of God.
Thank you again for the wonderful support for the Synod.

With every blessing

+ John

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

The Wellington Central Pastoral Area Newsletter

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

For some reason my children expect that I parent each one of them the same. They are very quick to point out when I have, in their eyes, been unfair in how I treated them compared to their siblings. There seems to be no understanding that each one of them is unique and that I have the choice to treat them as I see fit.

It seems nothing much has changed in the last 2000 years! In today’s Gospel we see the landowner paying each person the same regardless of what hours they have worked and this results in bedlam!
Ever thought why the landowner paid them in the reverse order? He could easily have paid them in a way that would have meant the first people hired would never have known what the last people hired got paid. But the landowner chose not to do that. He wanted them to see that they all got paid the same. He could have saved himself a ton of grief. Instead he decided to give everyone the same amount and was criticized for his generosity even though each person had agreed to the daily wage.

We believe that if you work more than someone else then you should be reimbursed for that time. And if not then we think it is unfair. Our accounting system is about ensuring balance….you do this, I get this. But God’s accounting system is very different. “The last will be first and the first will be last.” The first reading confirms this by reminding us, “my ways are above your ways and my thoughts are above your thoughts.”
The way the landowner acts is not what we would call the norm. What he has done we would describe as unfair.
We seem to be surprised by this but so much of life is unfair. Someone gets a promotion ahead of us, we struggle all our life with losing weight yet someone else can eat anything they want, we always do good for others yet others who don’t seem nice get to go on flash holidays etc. It is easy in times like this to compare ourselves to others just like the people in the Gospel story did and just as my children do. But Paul reminds us we should conduct our way worthy of the gospel of Christ. What does this mean?
It means to stop counting. To stop comparing. To stop having a sense of entitlement, that we deserve this or that. It’s about understanding that God’s love is underserved, we didn’t earn it but we got it anyway. Pure gift. Pure love. The challenge for us is to receive this love and reflect it back to all those we meet.

 

Fiona Rammell

 

 

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

Homily from Synod ’17 Closing Mass

 Final Synod Mass- 17th September 2017

I have never been to the Convent of the Sisters of St Joseph in Mission Bay, Auckland.  I have seen a photo of the stained glass window in their chapel. As you leave Mass today-  as you are sent out from this Synod you will be given a card with a photo of that window, what is more important are the words inscribed on the window. They are words attributed to Nano Nagle the Foundress of the Presentation Sisters.

“Go Out …you may not rest secure for need calls loudly.

You must seek God there.

Loving shall be your flame. “

120 recommendations have been made to me from this Synod, some of them are directly related to the life of the Church. Many of them are to do with where our mission is – out there!

As Nano Nagle says

“need calls loudly, you may not rest……seek God there…..

We will find God in the sick, the lonely, poor and homeless, the stranger…….we will find God out there….!!!

We are sent out because our Eucharist is supposed to pass over into concrete acts of love!

St Paul told us today that “The life and death of each of us has its influence on others.  It we live, we live for the Lord and if we die, we die for the Lord.”

When we live our whole lives through, with and in Jesus we are able to influence others.  That is what we are sent to do. Not to manipulate, never to control, but to influence with goodness, kindness, mercy, forgiveness and love. “Loving shall be your flame. “

Reflect on today’s Gospel, the servant who was forgiven much by his master, missed the whole point.  If he had deeply known the mercy of God he would have shown the same to his fellow servant.  It is only when we experience the power of the Gospel, that we can show it to others and influence others with it. The Gospel invites us to take forgiveness into the world we are sent to, rather than a desire for revenge – our world needs love and forgiveness.

We can bring a different value into the world. Today’s Gospel shows us that the face of the world can be transformed by forgiveness. By offering ourselves – you are the Church’s greatest resources – by offering ourselves – including our capacity to forgive, our Christian communities become – in the very midst of the world- the sacrament of God’s mercy. We don’t just offer ourselves – we offer who we are because of who we are in Jesus Christ …………. “I have neither silver nor Gold but I will give you what I have, in the name of Jesus the Nazarene……”

“Go Out …you may not rest secure for need calls loudly.

You must seek God there.

Loving shall be your flame.”

Cardinal John’s News 14 September 2017

The full newsletter can be viewed here.

Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Dear Friends

Tomorrow the sixth Synod of the Archdiocese of Wellington will begin. Previous Synods were held in 1876, 1888, 1988, 1998, and 2006. Actually the Synod has already begun; it began when I convoked the Synod on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception last December. Much preparatory work has gone on over the intervening months; I thank you all sincerely for that, and especially the Synod Steering Committee. However an enormous part of the work has been done by you, laity, religious and clergy of the Archdiocese. In May there were two major gatherings, one in the South Island part of the diocese and one in the North Island. Then in May, June and July several hundred people participated in the consultation phase of the synod. This meant people gathering together, listening to the voice of the Holy Spirit, listening to others, and praying and discerning before responses were sent in an analysed in preparation for this week-end. The process of discernment has been appreciated by many people and I have been told by them that they have begun to use this prayerful discernment process in various meetings and gatherings. The same process will be used over this Synod weekend.
Almost two years ago Pope Francis said “it is precisely this path of Synodality which God expects of this Church of the third millennium.” Please pray that all participants at the Synod this weekend will enter the weekend with the intention of “journeying together.”
At the second session of the Synod on the Family (October 2015), which I was privileged to be at, the Holy Father said “The world in which we live, and which we are called to love and serve, even with its contradictions, demands that the Church strengthen cooperation in all areas of her mission.” I therefore ask for your prayers again. As you know this Synod is about being “Sent Out” on mission, reminding all the baptised that we have a task to do, the task is to take Christ and His Gospel into the world around us. What I therefore ask of all the readers of this newsletter is that you pray that we find a way to ensure “that the Church strengthen cooperation in all areas of her mission.” The formal part of the Synod begins tomorrow, the Feast of Our Lady of Sorrows. We entrust the work of the Synod therefore to Mary who was given to us as
“As a Church which journeys together with men and wom-en, sharing the travails of history, let us cherish the dream that a rediscovery of the inviolable dignity of peoples and of the function of authority as service will also be able to help civil society to be built up in justice and fraternity, and thus bring about a more beautiful and humane world for coming generations. ” Pope Francis
our Mother as Jesus was dying on the cross and said to John and to us “This is your mother.” (John 19:26)

With thanks to you all for the support and prayers for this important event in the life of the Archdiocese. Every blessing.

+ John